Best Freddy Krueger Kills in the A Nightmare on Elm Street Movies

Wes Craven‘s A nightmare on Elm Street Franchise has no shortage of inventive deaths. A villain like Freddy Krueger (Robert Englund) would never be caught sticking to the basics, not with the entire dream world at his sharpened fingertips. However, that begs the question, what are Freddy Krueger’s biggest kills? The ones we hold on to, the ones who go all out with gross, horrific body horror so much that it stays with us for years to come. We’ve curated a list of Freddy Krueger’s most iconic kills (and a few of his beloved one-liners), just in time for your spooky month. So sit back, relax and enjoy the carnage.

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Grady in A Nightmare on Elm Street 2: Freddy’s Revenge (1985)

Freddy’s revenge is certainly not a fan favorite as all previous lore of the first film is thrown out the window. However, there is one death sequence that stands out from the rest (although it wasn’t at all similar to Freddy’s usual MO). Grady’s death scene is an ode to body horror and a superb display of practical effects. In this sequel, Freddy kills teenagers not through dreams, but through possession of Jesse (Mark Patton), a teenager who moved into the old Thompson house. Panicking, Jesse instructs his friend Grady (Robert Rusler) to watch over him while he sleeps to make sure he doesn’t kill again. Unfortunately for Grady, he falls asleep and becomes Krueger’s next victim. in a (n extraterrestrialFreddy Krueger bursts out of Jesse’s chest and Grady watches as he’s trapped in the room with him. Using his razor glove, Freddy rips through Grady’s chest with enough force to rip open the door while Grady’s parents desperately try to help him. While certainly not the most imaginative death on this list, the sheer fear in Grady’s eyes as he awaits his inevitable demise is enough to send chills down anyone’s spine.

Greta in A Nightmare on Elm Street 5 (1989)

Greta’s death is easily one of Freddy Krueger’s most gruesome and sadistic murders. Greta (Erika Anderson), an aspiring model, falls asleep at a dinner party her overbearing mother is throwing to further her modeling career. It’s clear throughout the film that the two have a trying relationship, especially when it comes to food. That’s what makes this scene particularly heinous. Krueger force-feeds Greta her own guts until her cheeks swell and she suffocates. Worse, he also humiliated her with illusions of party-goers and her own mother laughing hysterically at her vilification. It’s all of Greta’s worst fears wrapped up in one horrible last meal. The scene is really gross and one of the hardest kills to watch. Greta deserves better.

Dan in A Nightmare on Elm Street 5 (1989)

Dans (Danny Hassel) Death Scene is one of Freddy’s most complex dream sequences. And was cruel enough to be seriously cut down to avoid an X-rating. After getting a panicked call from his girlfriend Alice (Lisa Wilcox), Dan rushes off and finds himself trapped in a dream. His truck comes to life, the seat belts buckle him up and the pedal turns around his foot. Krueger taunts him in the passenger seat and forces him into a head-on collision, throwing Dan out of the car. Relatively unharmed, Dan finds a motorcycle and uses it to escape. However, the bike begins to fuse with Dan, threading wires through his flesh and his skin melting from his body as he screams in agony. He wakes up back in his truck just in time for another collision, this time killing him instantly. This death is even more heartbreaking considering Dan never knew he was going to be a father.

Joey in A Nightmare on Elm Street 4: The Dream Master (1988)

I don’t know about you, but the A nightmare on Elm Street Franchise gave me an unhealthy fear of waterbeds. Joey’s death scene in particular can confirm this. After Joey falls asleep in his bed one night (Rodney Eastman) has a dream in which the gorgeous model on the poster on his wall is naked and swimming in his waterbed. Intrigued, Joey approaches for a closer look, only for Freddy to burst through the plastic and drag Joey into the water. The water turns red as it fills with Joey’s blood, and it serves as a sort of ode to Glens (Johnny Depp) death in the original film. The next morning, Joey’s mother throws back his sheets to find Joey dead, trapped in the waterbed. Joey’s death shows that you should never be wary of Freddy Krueger – he’s never really dead, is he?

Jennifer in A Nightmare on Elm Street 3: Dream Warriors (1987)

Jennifer’s (Penelope Sudrow) Dream sequence was a great ode to horror cinema as her character aspired to be an actress. Her death is inspired by poltergeist, with her costume similar to Carol Anne’s when being sucked into the television screen. After the TV goes static, Jennifer (with her blonde hair and a girly nightgown) approaches to inspect her, only to be grabbed by robotic hands and lifted while Freddy’s head pops out of the top of the TV. Freddy uses these arms to shove Jennifer’s head into the TV, electrocuting and killing her. This Freddy kill became as iconic as a Robert Englund Adlibbed line. Just before he kills Jennifer, Freddy’s sentence was simple, “That’s it, Jennifer. Your big break on TV!” however, Englund added, “Welcome to Primetime, bitch!” — making this a much-cited line of the franchise and the popular Freddy one-liner.

Taryn in A Nightmare on Elm Street 3: Dream Warriors (1987)

For anyone who is afraid of needles, it is best not to see this death. After Taryn enters a dream to save Joey from Freddy (Jennifer Ruby) gets separated from the group and meets Freddy. The two get into a knife fight, which Taryn tolerates well until Freddy uses her worst nightmare against her. Because Taryn used to be a drug user, Freddy’s blade fingers turn into needles. Her former needle scars reappear and are disgusting, swollen, flashing sores on her arms, seriously triggering your trypophobia. Freddy impales Taryn with the needles, injecting her with the strange blue substance and killing her. Taryn was a local badass and was holding up pretty well when she was cornered by Freddy, making her death even more disappointing.

Phillip in A Nightmare on Elm Street 3: Dream Warriors (1987)

sleepwalker and puppeteer Phillip (Bradley Gregg) has by far one of the most difficult-to-watch death scenes for the squeamish. Notorious for his sleepwalking, Phillip’s roommate Kincaid (Ken Sagoes) doesn’t bat an eye when Phillip leaves the room in his sleep. He doesn’t know, Freddy Krueger has slashed his arms and legs and is playing Phillip with his veins/tendons. The sight is truly terrifying as he forces Phillip to stand on the edge of the tower. Worse, the only witness to this is the mute Joey, who does everything in his power to alert the hospital staff. It’s too late, however, and the residents of the hospital scream as Freddy cuts the stitches and causes Phillip to fall to his death. This death traumatized the rest of the group and is unfortunately described as an unusual accident for them. The sheer helplessness of Joey and the others in this scene is what makes Freddy’s murder so unforgettable.

Tina in Nightmare on Elm Street (1984)

Tine (Amanda Wyss) really seemed like she would be our last girl. The film begins to revolve around Tina and her nightmares, but similar to Marion in it Psycho, we are thrown for a loop as she is the first to be dead. In her final nightmare, Freddy chases her down an alleyway back to her house. Unable to get in, Freddy takes her to the ground and the two wrestle until Freddy gets the upper hand and slices into her chest. Her punches wake up her friend Rod (Jsu Garcia), who watches as invisible claws tear through Tina’s body and throw her to the ceiling. It’s a horrible death to watch Rod scream her name, unable to help her as she falls dead into bed. Funnily enough, this scene was inspired by the musical Royal Wedding, in which Fred Astaire performs a dance number in a rotating room. So they built a rotating set to give the illusion of Tina being pulled to the ceiling, resulting in one of the most memorable scenes in the entire franchise.

Debbie in A Nightmare on Elm Street 4: The Dream Master (1988)

Well, Debbie (Brooke Thiess) wasn’t the nicest girl, but she didn’t deserve the horrible end that befell her in any way. Freddy visits her in her dreams while she is lifting weights and pushes her barbell down far enough to break her elbows. Their arms then fall off and begin to sprout insect legs. Panicking, Debbie runs away and finds herself in a box with orange glue covering the bottom. It’s a cockroach trap. When Debbie gets stuck on the glue, her body completely transforms into a hideous cockroach as she screams in agony. Freddy then crushes the box, effectively ending her life. For someone with an intense fear of bugs, this scene is particularly terrifying, which makes knowing that Debbie hated bugs even worse.

Glen in Nightmare on Elm Street (1984)

The classics really can’t be beat, and Glen’s nightmarish death sequence is proof of that. Whenever anyone thinks of it A nightmare on Elm Street, that death is usually the first thing that comes to mind. After the conspiracy with the last girl Nancy (Heide Langenkamp) about how to defeat Freddy Krueger, Glen decides to stay up the night until they can complete their plan later that night. However, Glen accidentally falls asleep while watching TV and listening to music, falling victim to Freddy. His bed turns into a sinkhole of sorts, dragging Glen and his TV down the hole. After a moment, a geyser of blood spurts out, marking a brutal end for Glen. This scene was truly an achievement in terms of practical horror effects, using 500 gallons of blood. However, there was a mishap during filming that caused a minor blood tsunami and led to a power outage on the set. Luckily they were able to save this iconic scene.

https://collider.com/best-freddy-krueger-kills-a-nightmare-on-elm-street-horror/ Best Freddy Krueger Kills in the A Nightmare on Elm Street Movies

Sarah Ridley

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