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‘Better Call Saul’ Used a ‘Breaking Bad’ Crossover to Set Up Its Endgame

It took six and a half seasons, but in last night’s episode It’s better to call Saul finally… broke. When Break As the prequel series begins, Bob Odenkirk’s Jimmy McGill seems so far removed from his days as unscrupulous criminal defense attorney Saul Goodman that the idea of ​​Bryan Cranston and Aaron Paul resurfaces. Break Saul’s most notorious client roles seemed unlikely. But in reality, there was no way Vince Gilligan and company ended the show—since then have been active in numerous references to its parent series, mostly through arcs involving Mike. Ehrmantraut (Jonathan Banks) and Gus Fring (Giancarlo Esposito)—without giving us a cameo of Walt and Jesse. Saul the producers even went so far as to confirm it before this final season. So it just becomes a matter of when and how. The wait was finally over last night, in an episode simply titled “Breaking Bad” (a winking nod to Saul’s first appearance on the show). BB “Better call Saul”).

(Spoilers for August 1 It’s better to call Saul follow.)

The series effectively ended its prequel timeline a few weeks ago, when it leaped into the show’s black-and-white post-Heisenberg future, where Jimmy now lives in exile, playing the lowly Cinnabon manager coward Gene Takovic. “Breaking Bad” holds the camera for Gene as he is tempted and becomes the boss of a low-cost but lucrative scam. But writer/director Thomas Schnauz was cunning in his structure; the episode is interspersed with Bad-era flashback takes place during and around the events of “Better Call Saul”, the episode that introduces us to Odenkirk’s character in time. We see Saul (the name he was going by at the time) rolling around in the back of the mobile drug lab favored by the duo in the early part of the series before they hauled him out into the desert. . We then go back inside the lab after we both pay Saul to help them solve the problem that brought them all together. Here, we get a little more context: Saul probes around the lab and gets a general feel for how they can produce the famous “blue stuff” that’s becoming popular on the streets of Albuquerque. The chemistry — pun intended — between Cranston and Paul is as rich and powerful as ever; the two haven’t lost a single step in their time away from the characters (Probably because Cranston and Paul have been close in real life, even trading Mezcal together.) It was a quick cameo. and fleeting, but seeing the two of you together again is a treat.

Saul Creator Peter Gould is concerned about bringing back Walt and Jesse. In an interview with Rolling Stone, Gould talked about how he didn’t want to have “scenes that we wanted to see because we wanted to see them.” Break epoch.” Accordingly, the episode is not just Break karaoke. It provided important context for Saul’s thought process as he made the decision to formally approach Walt with a partnership proposal. We know the result of their union: a lot of turmoil, death, and Jimmy is liberated from the law but stuck in a life of so much fun, he might as well be a mortal. “Breaking Bad” recounts the beginning of a partnership that is Saul’s original sin, the moment of doom that begins the end in motion.

Combining these scenes with Cinnabon Gene’s performance of his return to Saul’s persona is particularly sharp on a pure plot level — less than we’ve come to expect from Saul. What’s more, the series uses Breaking Bad’s cameo to announce its end game. Saul represents Jimmy’s addiction to a life of fraud; allowing Walt to serve his own ego was his biggest mistake. Now “Gene” is chasing the top once again — and seemingly dangerously close to a fate worse than joining the Walt that landed him. With two episodes left in the series, how far will Jimmy fall this time?

https://www.gq.com/story/better-call-saul-breaking-bad-bryan-cranston-aaron-paul-walter-jesse-cameo ‘Better Call Saul’ Used a ‘Breaking Bad’ Crossover to Set Up Its Endgame

Russell Falcon

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