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‘Blonde’ Could Make the World Safe for NC-17 Films Again

In short: pretty extreme. Although Dominik worked with Jennifer Lame, an editor hired by Netflix to “restrain the excesses” of the film, what remains is shocking in both its frankness and brutality. YellowThe film’s plot includes a visual rape, an unflattering depiction of abortion, and an expansive fantasy scene that alone wouldn’t qualify for an R rating. It’s destined to cause split, opening herself up to criticism for downplaying and simplifying Monroe for a victim identified by the abuse piled on her. But you don’t have to like the movie to respect Dominik’s vision, regardless of the disturbing content. We live in a time when cinema is largely defined by franchises and movies as fodder for a bottomless pile of content — it’s worth remembering that they’re also forms of artistic expression, even if That artistic expression sometimes takes unpleasant forms.

But the movie is definitely here in part because of the bumps that made the NC-17 no longer available. Streaming services don’t rely on theatrical releases, TV commercials, or blockbusters. In theory, NC-17 ratings could thrive on services like Netflix, Hulu, and HBO Max and Yellow could be a sign of things to come, could be a sign for other filmmakers to cross the limits of the R rating.

Or maybe that moment was already here. YellowIts NC-17 rating might make it novel, but streaming services are already filled with movies that would earn NC-17 if they hit theaters. (Yellow receives ratings because it’s being released in theaters, but television’s content ratings are determined by the streaming networks and services themselves.) In 2020, for example, the Netflix success of the movie Three Lan 365 days – a lengthy sex and prison study with S&M that will make fans 50 shades of gray blush – has made it an international sensation. (Two sequels later.) 365 Day may be one of the clearer examples of edgy content on streaming services, but it’s hardly exceptional, especially with the normalization of nudity and sex scenes. Education created by cable TV series from Sopranos arrive Shameless arrive Game of Thrones in the 21st century (much of which will never fit the bounds of an R rating).

So that place left Yellow? It is capable of shocking even viewers who have been stunned by years of watching TV-MA (TV’s designation for content suitable for adult audiences) without thinking twice – and, regardless its artistic qualities, that may be its most enduring contribution. It’s a reminder that movies can still be shocking. And sometimes they yes shocking to tell the story they want to tell the way they want to tell it. Dominik sees Monroe’s life as a series of horrors, from child abuse to the dehumanizing impact of celebrity. It is a feverish nocturnal dream about a movie defined by the absence of soft edges, a tired watch that is also a stark contrast to the safety of most content. all movies. YellowMy ratings feel like vestiges of an outdated set of rules. It’s also a reminder that, in the world of streaming, those rules don’t really have to apply anymore.

https://www.gq.com/story/blonde-ana-de-armas-netflix-marilyn-monroe-nc-17 ‘Blonde’ Could Make the World Safe for NC-17 Films Again

Russell Falcon

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