Christoph Waltz On Doing Another Western in ‘Dead for a Dollar’ and Something Even Rarer—Playing a Good Guy

Every European culture has in some way adapted and imitated that Western genre. Because it’s all about the dream of going west to freedom, into the dreamland of opportunities, where you can start over, where you can be yourself, where you have to fend for yourself. yourself, you have to test your aptitudes and abilities and be basically a man. Because women, unfortunately, are just side characters in these stories.

Some of your most famous characters, from Hans Landa to Blofeld, are well known for their slick speech, talking through situations. Max Borlund is a man who speaks as little as possible and speaks very directly. I think at one point he even said, “I don’t usually tell the same man twice.” Is one performance type easier than the other?

No. I try not to be a brand actor who develops a brand and then sticks to that, say James Cagney, to be polite. But I try to follow the lead of the screenwriter, and the script, and find what fits the case and doesn’t over-generalize, for example, the genre or the actor’s personality. I really make an effort to stick with the individual character because it serves a very specific purpose. And without specificity, you have nothing more or less.

Walter Hill’s screenplays are famously brief. This movie only hints at Max’s past. When faced with such a situation, do you fill out your own story?

Well, I don’t like talking about these things… You’re doing it by accident. You do it even while sitting in the stands watching a movie. You fill it with whatever you have at your disposal. It’s all like that. Because what I do behind the scenes is completely irrelevant. People need to do whatever they do to help themselves improve. And if they can make it themselves, even better. You should refer to the best sources and sources are always the command itself. But if there’s something you don’t know or you’re suddenly interested in or you’re intrigued, go for it. […] You can use a completely different person’s plot or make up a story, or you can relate it to another time, another gender, whatever. All of that is your problem. Because ultimately, it needs to serve a purpose.

The point is, what makes it appear on the screen is what really matters?

No, what makes it Turn off screen is important. The content on the screen is just there to inspire you in the hearts of your audience.

How would you rate your riding skills?

Well, I’ve been doing it for a while, but not often. So it should be better than it is. But riding is like singing, you need to do it on a regular basis to do it elegantly and so it’s at least enough for the other creatures involved, maybe your family. at home about singing or poor horse on how to ride .

You’ve worked for years in movies and TV shows that English-speaking audiences don’t see much of. Is there a project you’d like to revisit for your audience to rediscover?

No. I don’t even think about those things. I don’t know, maybe it’s something in my brain or maybe it’s something in my personality or both. I do not know. Once I finished it, I finished it. And I’ve done a lot of things that I’m not necessarily proud of. And I’ve done some things that I’m lucky and happy to say passers-by. And the two to an equal degree immediately fell into oblivion when I was done with them.

Why do you think that?

It is professional psychology and hygiene. It’s not like I forgot them, but it’s not something I always need to be present. A lot of them I forgot, but for good reasons.

https://www.gq.com/story/christoph-waltz-dead-for-a-dollar-interview Christoph Waltz On Doing Another Western in ‘Dead for a Dollar’ and Something Even Rarer—Playing a Good Guy

Russell Falcon

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