I’m a Waffle House worker – there’s a secret lingo we use to talk about diners & what’s on your plate reveals the truth

A waffle house employee has uncovered the secretive jargon chefs use when preparing food.

Katie Pearson, who worked at a South Carolina restaurant, revealed kitchen staff use a code to ensure orders go to diners correctly.

Employees use secret jargon at Waffle House (stock image)

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Employees use secret jargon at Waffle House (stock image)Photo credit: Vimeo
Chefs arrange plates of condiments and dishes to pass their orders to the team

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Chefs arrange plates of condiments and dishes to pass their orders to the teamPhoto credit: Vimeo

Pearson told the Associated Press that waiters read orders and prompted chefs to start arranging plates.

Chefs use condiments, cutlery and groceries to route the order to their team.

She revealed that a jelly cup on the front of the plate means scrambled eggs.

While a jelly cup next to a slice of cheese equals a scrambled egg with cheese.

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Buttercups refer to waffles, while a bag of mustard, placed face up, is code for a pork chop.

The restaurant uses a secret jargon so that the orders can get to the customers as quickly as possible.

Pearson admitted that she initially found her experience of working at the grill frustrating.

She said: “I’ve cooked at home and stuff, and I’d seen them (other Waffle House employees) cook, but I’d never cooked for Waffle House before. I didn’t handle it well.”

But as she gained more experience, she said it “can be fun” to keep up with the orders coming in.

Pearson said the two most important skills to have when working at Waffle House are “multitasking and communication.”

She said: “I’m usually very good at multitasking, but when I started here I didn’t know how to prioritize.”

But the worker revealed she’s learned to “put priorities in order”.

Over time, she admitted that prioritizing tasks was becoming “easier.”

Waffle House isn’t the only company using a secret language.

The US Sun has reported how Target employees may use strange words and phrases when communicating with one another.

Many Target employees or “team members” hate “coping,” Mental Floss reported.

This refers to an annoying situation in which employees have a closing shift and open the shop the next morning.

“I would (like to) get rid of the Cloopen shifts,” former Target employee Adam told Mental Floss.

Target’s “race track” is the main walkway that circles the store.

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“A main aisle encircles the store, with additional aisles running through the center and around the edges, providing more space for product display,” the store’s website reads.

And a “reshop” refers to goods that are out of place and need to be returned to their original location.

The restaurant uses a secret jargon so that the orders can get to the customers as quickly as possible.

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The restaurant uses a secret jargon so that the orders can get to the customers as quickly as possible.Photo credit: Vimeo

https://www.the-sun.com/lifestyle/6945831/waffle-house-worker-secret-lingo-diners/ I’m a Waffle House worker – there’s a secret lingo we use to talk about diners & what’s on your plate reveals the truth

Emma James

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