Storm front brings flash flooding to Southern California

Another menacing storm front moved into Southern California early Thursday morning, bringing torrential rain, flash flooding concerns, strong winds and dangerous surf as the region continues to be battered by a moisture-rich atmospheric flow that has ravaged the entire state in recent days .

The cold front and the heaviest rainfall passed through the Los Angeles area at midnightwith about 1 to 2 inches of rain falling at lower elevations and 2 to 5 inches of rain at higher elevations, National Weather Service meteorologists in Oxnard said.

Though the storm system passed hours earlier than expected, the region remained threatened by isolated thunderstorms, strong winds and flooding through Thursday as a cold mass of air in the wake of the storm had moved into the area, forecasters said. At least 1 to 2 inches of additional precipitation was expected.

A flash flood watch remained in force A winter storm warning was issued for the mountains of Los Angeles and Ventura counties through 10 p.m. Thursday through 10 p.m. Thursday, with up to a foot of fresh snow expected for some of the highest regions and wind gusts reaching 55 miles per hour.

High surf warnings are also in place for much of the central and south-west coast through Friday, with waves potentially reaching 22 feet in some areas. Meteorologists expect significant beach erosion, especially at high tide. Los Angeles County offers sandbag pickup at a number of locations.

An umbrella blows over at a downtown crosswalk.

A gust of wind blows over a pedestrian’s umbrella in downtown Los Angeles.

(Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times)

“It’s definitely one of our strongest systems here in Southern California,” said Ariel Cohen, meteorologist with the National Weather Service.

The burn scars from the Fish and Bobcat fires near Duarte and the route burn scars near Lake Castaic could see up to half an inch of rain and be subject to mud and debris flows, forecasters said. The burn scar at Lake Hughes north of the Santa Clarita Valley was also of concern.

Concerns about debris flow mud prompted Los Angeles County officials to warn residents near the lakeside burn scar and at the north end of the Bobcat burn scar in and around the Angeles National Forest by Friday morning to be “ready” for possible evacuations be.

The Sepulveda Basin was closed early Thursday due to high water levels, and several streets in Los Angeles were flooded. according to the Los Angeles Police Departmentt.

“Accidents and traffic collisions are everywhere,” said California Highway Patrol Officer Moises Marroquin. He said roadway flooding was pervasive.

The Lost Hills Station of the Los Angeles Sheriff’s Department said in a tweet Fallen trees and small rockfalls have been reported throughout the area and residents have been advised to stay home.

In the less than 48 hours since the warm front moved in, downtown Los Angeles received about 0.67 inches of rain, while Beverly Hills received 1.8 inches. About 2.96 inches of rain fell on Woodland Hills in the San Fernando Valley and about 1.69 inches on Newhall in the Santa Clarita Valley. Higher elevation precipitation totals exceeded 3.5 inches in some areas, including the Lechuza Fire Station in the Santa Monica Mountains.

A lonely figure is walking on a jetty in low clouds.

Chris Rohloff of Venice walks along a jetty on Ballona Creek to check out the surf on Wednesday.

(Christina House / Los Angeles Times)

Eagle Rock Reservoir recorded 1.11 inches and Pasadena only reached 1 inch.

“These totals can and will likely increase,” said Kristan Lund, meteorologist at the National Weather Service.

Thursday’s storm follows a series of storms — what experts are calling atmospheric flux — that have pounded California and prompted Gov. Gavin Newsom to declare a state of emergency on Wednesday to bolster “response and recovery efforts” in the already oversaturated areas support state.

In northern California, where the storm was most severe, torrential rain and strong winds on Wednesday killed a small child, prompted evacuations and power outages, and fueled fears of widespread flooding and debris flows.

Though still significant in Southern California, the worst conditions have spared the region.

“The center of the major weather system affecting the state will remain north of the region,” Cohen said. “We’re more on… the southern periphery of the system. But it’s still an area where atmospheric flow will combine with this weather disruption to support the potential for flooding.”

Elsewhere in Southern California, Santa Barbara County officials on Wednesday ordered the evacuation of certain properties in and around areas previously scorched by the Thomas, Cave and Alisal fires, citing the risk of flooding and debris flows.

Caltrans District 5, which includes Santa Barbara County, reported a complete closure of Highway 154 from the intersection of Highway 154 and Highway 256 to the intersection of Highway 154 and Highway 192 due to multiple rock and mudslides, the agency said a with Tweet Thursday morning.

In Orange County, flooding closed the Pacific Coast Highway between Warner Ave and Seapoint Street in CalTrans District 12, which patrols Orange County. said in a tweet. Meteorologists received reports of downed trees in Burbank and warned of coastal flooding and coastal erosion.

The storm also hit parts of San Luis Obispo County, where nearly 3,000 residents were without power early Thursday morning. according to PowerOutage.Us.

Forecasters warn that more is to come.

“We have a parade of storm systems heading into the area over the next week,” Cohen said.

Times contributor Grace Toohey contributed to this report.

https://www.latimes.com/california/story/2023-01-05/storm-socal Storm front brings flash flooding to Southern California

Alley Einstein

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