Supreme Court ruling guts the EPA’s ability to enforce Clean Air Act

In another historic reversal of a longstanding precedent, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled 6-3 Thursday along the party line to severely limit the Environmental Protection Agency’s powers in regulating carbon emissions from power plants, limiting the Biden administration’s ability to global Combat continues to impede heating.

Case, West Virginia v. Environmental Protection Agency, No. 20-1530, centered on both whether the Clean Air Act gives the EPA the power to regulate the energy industry and whether Congress is “speaking with particular clarity.” must when authorizing executive branch agencies to deal with major political and economic issues,” a theory the court called the “Major Questions Doctrine.”

Not only does this decision affect EPA’s ability to do its job, from capping emissions at certain power plants to enforcing existing cap and trade policies for carbon offsetting, it also hints at some other backward steps the conservative majority of the court plans to take. During the pandemic, the court blocked eviction moratoriums already enacted by the CDC and told OSHA it could not impose immunization requirements for large businesses. More recently, the court has ruled that states are unable to regulate their own gun laws but perfectly fine with regulating women’s bodily autonomy.

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https://www.engadget.com/supreme-court-ruling-guts-epa-ability-to-enforce-clean-air-act-145027419.html?src=rss Supreme Court ruling guts the EPA’s ability to enforce Clean Air Act

Russell Falcon

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