The ‘Better Call Saul’ Series Finale Is as Close to a Happy Ending as the ‘Breaking Bad’ Universe Gets

Spoilers galore track for the end of the series It’s better to call Saul

In “Second Opinion”, volume three of SopranosCarmela (Edie Falco) reluctantly agrees to see a therapist, who tells her she must leave her gangster husband, and suggests that Tony Soprano might find his way back to humanity if he can read Crime and punishment and sat in “his cell and pondered his crimes every day for seven years, so that he might be redeemed.” It’s a course of action that applies to many of the main characters on 21st-century television — but in the finale of last night’s AMC series Better call Saul, “Saul Gone,” Jimmy McGill (Bob Odenkirk) becomes the first anti-hero to choose that fate for himself, going so far as to argue that his guaranteed 7-year sentence will be extended to 86.

Surprisingly, we learn that it was fellow anti-hero Walter White who indirectly saved Saul Goodman’s soul, even if their meeting was what initially sent the lawyer down the path to purgatory. One of the most notable passages of “Saul Gone” revisits the timeline of its predecessor, Break. Near the end of that series run, Jimmy, aka Saul Goodman, and Walter, aka Heisenberg (Bryan Cranston), hid in a basement as they both waited for the Vacuum Repair Man, who runs the Informal Resettlement Program for the Criminal Underworld. This arrangement is not suitable for stress fugitives who are always looking for ways to put stress on others.

Trying to calm the mood with the perpetually irritable Walter, Saul told of his Slippin’ Jimmy man days. But the attraction fades when Walter stares at him and says, “So you’ve always been like this.” Saul’s gruff, seductive mask was easily ripped off, Saul mused to himself, the mask he seems to be stuck in as the footage slowly fades to see him soar high in the sky. years later, handcuffed next to the chief of the Air Force escorting him from Omaha to the Albuquerque courthouse. Walt’s insult haunted him, but it also inspired him to lay the groundwork for the dramatic courtroom confession that is considered the climax of the episode — and the series as a whole. After previously unleashing his superhuman abilities to cast doubt on even the most obvious facts to a jury, he initially fooled the prosecutor into settling for an unfairly short prison sentence. . But in the end, after making sure Kim was there to see him, Saul admitted to all his crimes during sentencing, effectively demanding that he be fully punished, essentially responding Kim’s wish that he “turn himself in”. Saul knew Walt was right that he was always “that way”. But he wants to prove that he doesn’t always have to it is in in that way.

“Anyone who studies the people around you, you can see that making a real change is very difficult and rare,” Saul co-creator Peter Gould recently told The Hollywood Reporter. “In TV series, we always say, ‘Oh, it’s about a personality change,’ but sometimes the characters just become the same as they already are, or they’re continuing on the path that they were. set out for himself.” The question of whether Saul was always “like this” and whether he could change was at the heart of Saul’s work. It’s better to call Saul from start. That’s an answer It’s better to call Saul discontinued for a long time. For six seasons, we watched Jimmy try to escape his Slippin’ Jimmy past and never quite get there. He has proven himself to be a talented attorney with immense compassion for his older clients at Sandpiper Crossing. He can still manipulate and torture the emotions of those same customers, but he also feels guilty and leaves an easy, instant payday. Jimmy’s inner conflict makes him unpredictable even when his final destination is never in doubt: We know from Break where his legal career will take him.

https://www.gq.com/story/better-call-saul-series-finale-saul-gone The ‘Better Call Saul’ Series Finale Is as Close to a Happy Ending as the ‘Breaking Bad’ Universe Gets

Russell Falcon

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