The weather condition pilots hate flying in the most – as it can cause crashes

PILOTS are professionals when it comes to flying an airplane even in difficult weather.

But there is one type of thunderstorm that they hate the most – as it can cause the most accidents.

A certain type of thunderstorm can cause problems even for experienced pilots

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A certain type of thunderstorm can cause problems even for experienced pilotsPhoto credit: Getty – Contributor

Andrew Ward, a former meteorologist for the Met Office at Heathrow, explained why.

He told Sun Online Travel: “Thunderstorms are the most dangerous types of weather for airplanes, they can cause multiple hazards and reach altitudes of 35,000ft, which is the cruising altitude for an airplane – however they are very difficult to fly as a result.

“Although pilots can fly through them, they try to avoid doing so. They can be as wide as 12 miles or more – very large areas – and they can also cause severe turbulence, forcing a pilot to take a different route whenever possible.”

In severe cases – the type seen as a real hazard to pilots – Andrew reveals that a plane could crash as a result of a thunderstorm due to what is known as a “microburst”.

He told us: “A microburst is a sudden downward wind current that can rush down from the top of a thunderstorm in a matter of minutes, creating really strong winds in excess of 50 miles per hour that are not visible.

“Planes flying close to a thunderstorm can suddenly be hit by them and crash.”

“It’s more likely to happen in places like the US where everything is bigger and better, but it can also happen in the UK on a smaller scale.

“They’ve entered — and that’s a reason to stay away, it’s those hidden dangers that come with thunderstorms.”

Eastern Airlines Flight 66 crashed as a result of a microburst in 1975, as did Delta Airlines Flight 191 in 1985, although weather forecasting systems are much more accurate these days.

While they prefer not to, Andrew revealed that sometimes a plane has to fly through a thunderstorm – due to air traffic control restrictions.

He said: “Sometimes a pilot has to navigate through a thunderstorm.

“If there’s not enough space, they have to fly through, but planes are built to withstand both storms and lightning.

“However, pilots would much rather fly around the storms if they can.”

However, Andrew revealed that whether planes fly or not is up to airports and airlines.

He said: “Ultimately it is up to the pilot to decide whether or not to fly a plane.

“There are hardly any weather conditions in which airplanes cannot fly now. For example, all aircraft today can take off and land in fog.”

Another pilot has revealed what really happens in his cockpit when a storm prevents a plane from landing.

However, pilots make the decision of whether they consider it too dangerous

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However, pilots make the decision of whether they consider it too dangerousCredit: PA:Press Association

https://www.the-sun.com/travel/6929784/plane-crash-weather-flight-storm/ The weather condition pilots hate flying in the most – as it can cause crashes

Emma James

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