US buys Nplate radiation sickness drug

The US government is spending $290 million to purchase a supply of a drug that can be used to treat the effects of radiation sickness.

Russian President Vladimir Putin has repeatedly signaled that he can use nuclear weapons to defend the country’s territory in Ukraine.

President Joe Biden has also warned that the world is at risk of a nuclear “Armageddon” amid the war in Ukraine.

“We haven’t faced the prospect of Armageddon since the Kennedy era and the Cuban Missile Crisis,” he said on October 6.

People Social media has since claimed that the United States is spending hundreds of millions of dollars buying an “anti-radiation” drug in preparation for a potential nuclear attack.

A VERIFY reader in Texas contacted the group to ask if the claims shared on social media were true. Google search data also shows people are asking if the US is buying a radiotherapy drug.

QUESTION

Is the US government buying a drug to treat the effects of radiation sickness?

SOURCES

ANSWER

This is the truth.

Yes, the US government is purchasing a drug that can be used to treat the effects of radiation sickness.

WHAT WE FIND

The US Department of Health and Human Services announced on October 4 that the US Department of Health and Human Services is spending $290 million to purchase a supply of a drug that can be used to treat medical injuries. red blood cells due to radiation sickness.

Nuclear weapons produce radiation, exposure to which can lead to death or illness, including long-term adverse health effects such as cancer.

More words VERIFY: Yes, in 1994 Russia promised never to attack Ukraine if it gave up its nuclear weapons

Acute radiation syndrome, also known as radiation sickness, occurs when a person’s entire body, or much of the body, is exposed to a high dose of penetrating radiation to one’s internal organs. them in a very short period of time. It can reduce the amount of platelets that form blood clots, which can lead to uncontrolled and life-threatening bleeding.

Nplate, a drug manufactured by Amgen USA Inc., was first approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2008 for the long-term treatment of an autoimmune disease that can cause bleeding excessive blood.

In January 2021, the FDA approved Nplate for the treatment of radiation sickness wounds in adults and children, including infants.

The federal government is purchasing Nplate supplies with funding from Project BioShield, established by law signed in July 2004. BioShield Project funding “is used to address security threats national security as determined by the Department of Homeland Security’s Material Threat Determination process,” according to HHS.

Products under Project BioShield can be purchased if they are authorized, approved, or cleared by the FDA, or if they can be made available under an emergency use authorization (EUA) during a public health emergency.

While HHS did not respond to a question about whether Russia’s war in Ukraine spurred the purchase of anti-radiation drugs, it said it was part of “continuous, long-term efforts to better prepared to save lives after radiation and nuclear emergencies. . “

This is the first time Amgen has offered Nplate to the federal government, a company spokesperson told VERIFY.

Amgen will maintain a government supply of Nplate, which HHS says will reduce costs for taxpayers and allow the drug to enter the commercial market for use before its expiration date.

More words VERIFY: No, iodine pills will not protect you from most radiation effects in a nuclear attack

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https://www.king5.com/article/news/verify/us-buying-amgen-nplate-radiation-sickness-drug-fact-check/536-9cce7569-2ce9-4fe9-86f0-413efde03487 US buys Nplate radiation sickness drug

Edmund DeMarche

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